About Us

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Twelve years ago, Brandy and Jeff launched the Tomhave Group from their kitchen table in Baltimore, determined to help rural and tribal communities across the United States. Both once worked on Capitol Hill and K Street in Washington, D.C., where each discovered that most federal decision makers can not find an Indian Reservation on a map. Many too, ignore the rest of rural America. Few understand the challenges of living without water, electricity, law enforcement, 911, ambulances, telephones or paved roads.

The Tomhave Group, Inc. is a government relations consulting firm that specializes in lobbying for the America D.C. forgot. Since our founding in 2003, we have secured approximately $110 million in project monies and $82.72 million in program funding for their clients. That includes $15 million dollars for road and water projects in counties the U.S. Census classifies as “frontier.”  That equals a 193% return on client’s investment in us.  Our 30 plus years of combined experience advocating for the policies, programs and resources that counties and tribes need to improve their services.

We do what K Street lobbyists don’t: invest time on the ground, in your community, to see your issues through your eyes.  We then carry that vision to Washington, D.C., where we inspire decision makers to see it too.  Our accomplishments page details how we penetrate the federal process to help small communities with big problems, like the dirt roads on the Navajo Nation.
See the links below:

Arizona Journal, November 23, 2015:

Deseret News, December 16, 2015:

Salt Lake Tribune, December 16, 2015:
Navajo Route 9010, the Pine Springs Road, is a 16 mile school bus route that until this year was among the worst unpaved roads on the Navajo reservation.  The federal funds we secured for its pre-construction activities helped transform N9010 from a mud bog to this modern two-lane hi-way.

Navajo Route 9010, the Pine Springs Road, is a 16 mile school bus route that until 2013 was among the worst unpaved roads on the Navajo reservation.  The federal funds we secured for its pre-construction activities helped transform N9010 from a mud bog to this modern two-lane hi-way.

On April 25, 2014, Navajo County, Arizona submitted testimony to Congress that we wrote in support of their Little Colorado River at Winslow Levee Feasibility Study.  This Study is a joint partnership between the County and Army Corps of Engineers that lays the groundwork necessary to improve Winslow’s flood protection and remove it from a 100 year flood zone.    Navajo County was the only jurisdiction in America to submit testimony to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee that advocates the unique interests of a small, rural, tribal community.


Navajo-Hopi Observer, March 18, 2014:

Winslow, Navajo County, Navajo Tribe representatives meet with Army Corps of Engineers at Little Colorado River Levee – Navajo-Hopi Observer – Flagstaff, Arizona

 

The Winslow Levee protects flooding along the Little Colorado River in northern Arizona.  After breaching twice in the 1990s, FEMA decertified the levee in 2008, which put Winslow's residents, business and critical infrastructure in a 100 year flood plain.  We helped Navajo County and the Army Corps of Engineers secure $2.592 million in federal funds to conduct a feasibility study - the first step towards permanent improvement. Because of our work, the President's FY'15 Budget contains $750,000 to complete the study, celebrated here with Colonel Kim Colloton, her Army Corps team, and Navajo County officials.

The Winslow Levee protects flooding along the Little Colorado River in northern Arizona.  After breaching twice in the 1990s, FEMA decertified the levee in 2008, which put Winslow’s residents, business and critical infrastructure in a 100 year flood plain.  We helped Navajo County and the Army Corps of Engineers secure $2.592 million in federal funds to conduct a feasibility study – the first step towards permanent improvement. Because of our work, the President’s FY’15 Budget contains $750,000 to complete the study, celebrated here with Colonel Kim Colloton, her Army Corps team, and Navajo County officials.